USCIS Accepting Green Card Applications Under LRIF Act Now

The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services is now accepting applications to adjust status to lawful permanent resident from certain Liberian nationals under Section 7611 of the National Defense Authorization Act (PDF) for Fiscal Year 2020, Liberian Refugee Immigration Fairness (LRIF), which was signed into law on Dec. 20, 2019.

Section 7611 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020, Liberian Refugee Immigration Fairness (LRIF), allows Liberian nationals and their spouses, unmarried children under 21 years old, or unmarried sons and daughters 21 years old or older living in the United States who meet the eligibility requirements to apply to become lawful permanent residents. The law was signed to provide relief to Liberians currently living in the United States with Temporary Protected Status (TPS) and Deferred Enforced Departure (DED)–programs that the Trump administration has sought to end.

To be eligible for lawful permanent residence under LRIF, a Liberian national must have been continuously physically present in the United States from November 20, 2014, to the date they properly file an application for adjustment of status. USCIS will accept properly filed applications until December 20, 2020, one year from the enactment of the LRIF.

The following grounds of inadmissibility do not apply to applicants under the LRIF:

  • Public Charge (INA 212(a)(4));
  • Labor Certification Requirements (INA 212(a)(5));
  • Aliens Present Without Admission or Parole (INA 212(a)(6)(A)); and
  • Documentation Requirements (INA 212(a)(7)(A)).

Aliens are ineligible under LRIF if they have:

  • Been convicted of any aggravated felony;
  • Been convicted of two or more crimes involving moral turpitude (other than a purely political offense); or
  • Ordered, incited, assisted or otherwise participated in the persecution of any person on account of race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group or political opinion.

In order to be eligible for a Green Card under the LRIF, you must meet the following requirements:

  • You properly file Form I-485, Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status by December 20, 2020;
  • You are a national of Liberia;
  • You have been continuously physically present in the United States during the period beginning on November 20, 2014, and ending on the date you properly file your Form I-485;
  • You are otherwise eligible for an immigrant visa; and
  • You are admissible to the United States for lawful permanent residence or eligible for a waiver of inadmissibility or other form of relief.

For more information on LRIF, see the USCIS page on the matter. To seek legal assistance or representation with this matter, please click here to make an appointment with an attorney.

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