What To Do When Your DACA Is Delayed

Your DACA renewal application has been pending for 105 days, and you have yet to get a new Employment Authorization Document (EAD) in the mail? Here is what you can do:

1. Initiate a service request at USCIS – Call USCIS National Service Center at 1-800-375-5283 and request to use the Service Request Management Tool (SRMT) to request expedited processing of your case and ask for an interim EAD, if your DACA renewal application was filed 120 days in advance. In most cases, you have to ask to speak to a supervisor.

In some limited cases, applicants who have had their initial DACA denied, can also use this tool as an appeal to inform USCIS that the denial based on an administrative error.

2. Elevate your case status: After making the initial service request, contact the USCIS Headquarters Office of Service Center Operations by email at: SCOPSSCATA@dhs.gov. You should receive a response within 10 days.

3. Seek assistance from the USCIS Ombudsman – Open a case assistance request with the USCIS Ombudsman by filing DHS-7001. After this step, initiate contact with USCIS Headquarters staff for assistance with your expedite request. I am happy to provide you the specific contact information should you reach this point.

4. Contact your Congressional Representative: If the matter continues to be unresolved and there is a lapse in your work authorization, contact your individual Congressional representative for assistance. You can find your representative here.

As a final note, applicants renewing their DACA should make sure to file 120-150 days before the expiry date listed on their Employment Authorization Document (EAD). Filing less than 120 days in advance may lead to delays in lapses of work authorization, and accruing of unlawful presence.

If you find this information helpful, share this post, and let others know about lallegal.com, as well as our Twitter, and Facebook pages. 

What do you think?

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Related Articles

House GOP Suffers Setback as Impeachment of Mayorkas Fails

In a dramatic turn of events, the House of Representatives on Tuesday failed to impeach Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas, falling short by a single vote in a major blow to House Republicans. The articles of impeachment, centered on accusations of mismanagement of the US-Mexico border, were ultimately defeated 214-216, with four Republicans joining all Democrats in opposition.

Read

USCIS Fee Increases Take Effect April 1, 2024

Get ready for a change in the immigration landscape! On April 1, 2024, the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will implement significant fee increases for a variety of immigration and naturalization benefits. This change, announced in January 2024, aims to help USCIS recover its operating costs more fully and support timely processing of new applications.

Read

Broken Promises at the Border: How Biden Is Abandoning Migrants

When President Biden ran for office, he promised a break from the cruel and restrictive immigration policies of his predecessor, Donald Trump. Yet, three years into his term and with re-election looming, a stark reality has set in: the dream of a humane and just immigration system seems to be fading faster than a desert mirage. Recent developments paint a disturbing picture of an administration seemingly backpedaling on its once-bold commitments, leaving countless migrants stranded in a morass of broken promises and unfulfilled hopes. Humanitarian changes to our immigration system continue to languish, with no hope of passage.

Read